Reinhardt Unviersity Home
Reinhardt Unviersity Home

History

Dr. Ken Wheeler's history lectures educate, inspire and even entertain. 

Dr. Kenneth H. Wheeler
Associate Professor of History

Going into Honors American History 2 class, you never knew how the room would be arranged.  If the desks were in a circle, you knew the class would be discussing historical documents we had read outside of class.  He would give us a question, and then sit back and let us run with it.  We had educated conversations about what we believed the documents were about, and you never knew where those conversations would lead.  Dr. Wheeler made the class interesting and enjoyable - a true adventure.
- Stephanie Barton '09, now pursuing a master's of biology at Tennessee Technological University

The study of the human past can work as a powerful tool to explain the human present. It is only in studying who we were that we can discover who we are. Such knowledge is essential to good citizenship, of both America and the world.

In studying the past, students of history are trained to think critically and write effectively. As well as being inherently rewarding, these skills are transferable to a wide variety of career choices, such as business, public service, archival and historic preservation, print and broadcasting media, and education.

Reinhardt’s history graduates are everywhere – teaching history at Roswell High School, working in the Georgia Governor’s Office of Consumer Affairs, and studying International Relations at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. They’re commanding soldiers in the Marine Corps, managing businesses, pursuing seminary degrees and law degrees in Atlanta, and studying history at Louisiana State University and Ole Miss.

Please see the links to the left for more information, First Floor Tarpley (the Reinhardt History Blog), or contact:

Dr. Anne Good
History Program Coordinator
7300 Reinhardt Circle
Waleska, Georgia 30183
770-720-5570, AMG@reinhardt.edu

  
  
AHA at Iron Furnace

Faculty and students in the Arts and Humanities Alliance (AHA) visit an iron furnace in north Georgia.