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February 2016 Programs - History Month in Georgia


The Funk Heritage Center is participating in the statewide Georgia History Festival sponsored by the Georgia Historical Society. Three excellent programs are scheduled during "Georgia History Month" held annually around the anniversary of the founding of the Colony of Georgia on February 12, 1733. The public is invited to all of these programs. Admission is $5, free for members and RU faculty, staff and students. Make reservations by calling 770-720-5967. See the information below for details concerning each program.

Dr. Joseph Kitchens, the FCH director, presents a special program February 9, 2 p.m.

Between Two Worlds: Creek and Cherokee Women is the title of this first program of the series on Georgia history. There was a time when the Creek and Cherokee women owned everything including their home and everything in it. This is a facinating story and you will be surprised when you find out what lead to changes for these matrilineal societies resulting in the Southeastern Indian women living in poverty.

Dr. Author William Rawlings returns to the Funk Heritage Center February 16, 2 p.m 

Dr. Rawlings will discuss the research he completed for his new book, The Second Coming of the Invisible Empire. Mercer University Press set March 2016 for the release date for this book about the history of Georgia's Ku Klux Klan. Look for this writer to explain many new and fascinating insights into this unique and important episode in American History. He had a sell-out crowd for his lecture last year at the museum year.     

A retired physician, Dr. Rawlings developed his interest in writing relatively late in life. His first five novels have been commercially successful, earning great reviews and interest from Hollywood. Born and raised in Sandersville, GA, he still lives on the family farm. After completing his postgraduate medical training in Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, he returned to Sandersville to practice medicine with his father.

Dr. George R. Lamplugh will present a lecture February 25, 2 p.m.

You will learn more about the removal of Georgia’s Native Americans and you will also learn about the part Georgia's Governor Gilmer (1829-1831, 1837-1839) played in the removal. His recent book, In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, is about this historian’s excursions into the history of his adopted state of Georgia. It includes a collection of many of his well-researched essays. The title of this lecture is “Indian Removal and Party Politics in Georgia.” This topic is the result of his study of Governor Gilmer and the Cherokees Indians.

Dr. Lamplugh retired from the faculty of The Westminster Schools in Atlanta in 2010. Since then, he has been working on a series of blogs and essays exploring some of  the South’s and Georgia’s most fascinating historical events. Come enjoy an afternoon with this interesting historian