Reinhardt University SACSCOC Compliance Certification

3.6.1 Post-baccalaureate Program Rigor

The institution’s post-baccalaureate professional degree programs, master’s and doctoral degree programs, are progressively more advanced in academic content than its undergraduate programs. (Post-baccalaureate program rigor)

Judgment check box Compliance

Narrative

Reinhardt University’s graduate programs, which are all master’s degree programs, are progressively more advanced in academic content than its undergraduate programs.  Evidence for this judgment comes from the following:  1) contrasting the “Purposes of Graduate Study” with the undergraduate “General Education Student Learning Outcomes,” 2) contrasting graduate with undergraduate courses, when there is a correspondence in subject matter, and 3) the capstone requirement of each graduate program which demonstrates the candidate’s mastery of and independent thinking about the discipline.

The Purposes of Graduate Study

Each graduate degree program has its own set of discipline-specific learning outcomes.  However, all graduate programs are aligned with “The Purposes of Graduate Study” published in the Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017.  [1] The “Purposes of Graduate Study” are progressively more advanced than the undergraduate General Education Student Learning Outcomes published in the Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017. [2]

Table 3.6.1-1 Contrast of the Purposes of Graduate Study and the Undergraduate General Education Student Learning Outcomes

The Purposes of Graduate Study

General Education Student Learning Outcomes

The graduate programs at Reinhardt University prepare students to become confident leaders in their chosen disciplines with the following attributes:

I.     Mastery of the current literature,
prevailing knowledge, and/or skill set
of a specific discipline;

II.   Mastery of critical thinking through
the practical application of theory;

III.  Mastery of skills to research a topic
thoroughly;

IV.  The ability to foster new knowledge
in a discipline; and

V.    The strong communication skills
necessary to present research.

 

The current [undergraduate] curriculum is tied directly to the nine General Education Student Learning Outcomes, which are divided among four broadly defined Liberal Arts Domains:

Domain I:  Communication

Students will demonstrate:
1. Effective expression of ideas through
writing, speech, and a variety of arts
experiences.

Domain II:  Critical Thinking and Inquiry

Students will demonstrate:
2. Integrative, critical thinking and
inquiry-based learning using evidence,
logic, reasoning, and calculation.

3. Informational, technological, and
scientific literacies, and knowledge of
research methods.

4. Independent thought and imagination;
preparation for lifelong learning.

Domain III:  Self, Society and Culture
Students will demonstrate:

5. Knowledge of the traditions of Western
civilization and their global context.

6. Knowledge of the diversity of societies
and cultures; the ability to view them-
selves and the world from cultural and
historical perspectives other than their
own.

Domain IV:  Values and Ethics

Students will demonstrate:
7. Integrity and ethical responsibility.

8. Understanding of and commitment to
physical, emotional, and spiritual
wellness.

9. Stewardship and civic engagement,

Coupled with the ability to work with
others both collaboratively and in
leadership roles.

Progressively more advanced academic content in master’s degree courses

Graduate level course numbering

Each graduate program is housed in an academic school; however, the course numbering system distinguishes graduate courses (500 and above) from undergraduate courses (100-400).

In one program, a 400-level course meets in conjunction with a graduate course:  “ENG 497 - MFA Special Topics” is a writer’s workshop designed for those who wish to participate in courses of the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Writing but not in the MFA degree.  These non-degree students may have their creative work evaluated by professional instructors/authors.  The course description from “ENG 520 – Writer’s Workshop” [3] reveals the following requirements for the degree candidates that are not included in ENG 497 [4]:

  • detailed written peer critique reports to all the students in the workshop
  • additional materials in response to writing prompts during the Residency
  • a one-on-one meeting with the instructor about the candidate’s work during the Residency

In addition, ENG 497 credit may not be converted to degree program credit if the individual decides to apply to the MFA degree program, and non-degree seeking students are not eligible for financial aid.

Progressively more advanced course content

Graduate programs at Reinhart University demonstrate progressively more advanced course content when contrasted with undergraduate courses of the same subject area, as illustrated by the following six sample contrasts, which are discussed in detail below:

BUS 625 with BUS 303
BUS 610 with BUS 300
BUS 621 with BUS 422
EDU 510 with EDU 230/EDU 325
EDU 550 with EDU 325/327
ENG 560 with EDU 386/389

The Master of Business Administration (MBA)

Except for the addition of a learning outcome about advanced research, the MBA student learning outcomes are identical to the undergraduate Business Administration learning outcomes.  However, a comparison of individual courses demonstrates that the course content is progressively more advanced in the graduate courses to align with "The Purposes of Graduate Study.”

Table 3.6.1-2 Comparison of MBA
and B.S. in Business Administration Student Learning Outcomes

      MBA Student Learning Outcomes  [5]

 

       B.S. in Business Administration
Student  Learning Outcomes 
[6]Students who complete the Bachelor of  Science (B.S.) in Business Administration
program will be able to
M 1 Critical Thinking, Analytical and Problem-Solving Skills - analyze business situations using information and logic to make recommendations for problem solving and decision making.

M 2  Interpersonal, Teamwork, Leadership, and Communications Skills - use team building and collaborative behaviors in the accomplishment of group tasks and will communicate effectively the problem alternatives considered, a recommended solution, and an implementation strategy in oral, written and electronic form.

1.  Analyze business situations using information and logic to make recommendations for problem solving and decision making. (Critical Thinking, Analytical and Problem-Solving Skills)

2 . Use team building and collaborative behaviors in the accomplishment of group tasks and will communicate effectively the problem alternatives considered, a recommended solution, and an implementation strategy in oral, written, and electronic form (Interpersonal, Teamwork, Leadership, and Communications Skills)

M 3 Ethical Issues and Responsibilities - recognize and analyze ethical dilemmas and propose resolutions for practical business solutions

M 4 Business Skills and Knowledge -apply best practices, established theories, and managerial skills to business situations and problems

M 5 Awareness of Global and Multicultural Issues -demonstrate awareness of, and analyze, global and multicultural issues as they relate to business

M 6 Research Methodologiesderive business decision-making applications based upon sound research practices and procedures

3.  Recognize and analyze ethical dilemmas and propose resolutions for practical business solutions. (Ethical Issues and Responsibilities)

4.  Apply foundation business knowledge and skills to develop competent decisions within each (Functional Business Knowledge)

5. Develop awareness and analyze global and multicultural issues as they relate to business (Awareness of Global and Multicultural Issues)

The McCamish School of Business houses both a master’s degree and a bachelor’s degree in business.  Despite the similar learning outcomes, a comparison of courses with similar subjects demonstrates the advanced complexity in the graduate courses.

BUS 625 contrasted with BUS 303

The MBA course “BUS 625 – Managerial Accounting” requires academic preparation in accounting and finance, like “BUS 303 – Principles of Finance.”

Table 3.6.1-3 Course Description Contrast: BUS 625 with BUS 303

BUS 625 – Managerial Accounting, course description [7] BUS 303- Principles of Finance, course description [8]
Managerial Accounting at the graduate level offers real world tools for decision making within the framework of organizational strategy. Effective tools are linked with management concepts such as strategic position analysis, value chain analyses, and affects on decisions of how a business competes in the marketplace. Traditional cost behavior concepts, cost-volume-profit (CVP) analysis, and product costing are updated with real world examples and decision cases. New measures for relevant costs and reflective performance reports are prepared with reporting alternatives by segment, with transfer pricing and ending with an overall balanced scorecard. This course introduces the basic principles, theories, concepts, and terminology relative to financial management of a corporation or business. Topics include financial problem-solving techniques, present-worth concepts, capital budgeting, capital structure, analysis of risk and returns, and long-term and short-term financing alternatives

MBA applicants who have not successfully passed an undergraduate, upper-level course in finance, like Reinhardt’s BUS 303, at a regionally accredited college or university, are provisionally admitted to the MBA program.  The provision for full admittance is earning a “B” or “A” grade in Reinhardt’s “BUS 503 – Advanced Accounting and Finance Principles,” [9] an online course offered during the first semester of the MBA program to prepare for the advanced academic content of BUS 625 in the second semester.

BUS 610 contrasted with BUS 300

The MBA course, “BUS 610 – Organizational Communication,” focuses on learning about theories of communication processes and skills that contribute to the effectiveness of a business leader for organizations. However, the undergraduate business course,  “BUS 300 – Business Communication,” focuses on learning about basic types of professional business communications—like proposals, feasibility studies, or annual reports— and  about effectiveness as an individual, professional communicator. The course descriptions and requirements reflect this difference in range and complexity.

Table 3.6.1-4 Course Description Contrast: BUS 610 with BUS 300

BUS 610 – Organizational Communication, course description [10] BUS 300 – Business Communication, course description [11]
 

This course is an examination of modern concepts of effective business communications. Discussions focus on the theoretical bases of communication, the communication process, communication skills, case analysis, and development and implementation of business communication strategies.

 

This course is a study of written and oral business reporting, including letters, memos, proposals, feasibility studies, short reports, long reports, annual reports and formal analytical reports. Management concepts of business ethics and problem analysis are integrated with communication process and theory.

The syllabus for BUS 610 [12] includes the following advanced requirements that are not assigned in the undergraduate course syllabus [13]:

  • 2 Reflection papers (2 pp. each) to demonstrate independent thinking about specific topics in business communications
  • A Business Communication Audit (3-4 pp.) requiring a discussion of 4 scholarly articles
  • A final written and oral presentation project requiring 10 scholarly references about a topic that explores various components of a communication plan across organizations and industries.

BUS 621 contrasted with BUS 422

A similar example of advanced rigor is found in a contrast of the graduate course “BUS 621 – Human Resource Management” with “BUS 422- Human Resource Management.”  BUS 621 includes analytical projects.  Students learn to “devise” an “organizational structure” and to analyze strategies in the field of human resources.  In contrast, students in BUS 422 learn basic elements of Human Resource Management like staffing, training, and labor relations.

     Table 3.6.1-5 Course Description Contrast:  BUS 621 with BUS 422

BUS 621 – Human Resource Management,
course description [14]
BUS 422 – Human  Resource Management , course description [15]
This course teaches students to devise integrated organizational structures and strategies leading to competitive advantage through effective and creative management of people. Emphasis is placed on managing human assets in the context of a firm's strategy, industry, and stakeholder environment.  Topics in the course include human resource strategy, management of intangibles, strategic industry analysis, structuring for success, strategic alignment, human resource planning, and successful talent management. An exploration of the Human Resource function and its strategic role in organizational success. Human Resource Management deals with the efficient use of human talent to accomplish organizational goals. Study topics include human resource planning, staffing, training and development, compensation, safety and health, legal environments, labor relations and HR strategy. Prerequisite: BUS 301 or 307

The course syllabus for BUS 621 [16] includes the following advanced requirements that are not assigned in the undergraduate course syllabus [17]:

  • An annotated bibliography
  • A Financial Impact Research Paper and Presentation (10-15 pp.) about a human resource problem

In these and other cases, the MBA courses are progressively more advanced than the undergraduate courses.

The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) in Early Childhood Education

The Price School of Education (PSOE) houses both an undergraduate degree in Early Childhood Education and a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) in Early Childhood Education.  The Reinhardt MAT has been approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC)  to prepare students for initial certification at a Level-5 (graduate-level) certification. [18]  Candidates in Reinhardt’s MAT must complete 36 semester credit hours of graduate-level course work in addition to the 12 semester credit hour capstone requirement of Clinical Residency.

Because both the undergraduate degree and the MAT degree lead to initial certification with the GaPSC, there are identical learning outcomes.  However, there is a difference in expectations.  Expectations for MAT students are governed by “The Purposes of Graduate Study.” [1] The rigor at which MAT students work and the obstacles put before them are more challenging, as demonstrated by the course contrasts that follow.

EDU 510 contrasted with EDU 230/EDU 325

For example, “EDU 510 - Transformative Change and Responsive Teaching” combines the content about theory in “EDU 230- Common Elements of Differentiated Instruction” with the content about practical applications “EDU 325- Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction.”

Table 3.6.1-6 Course Description Contrast: EDU 510 with EDU 230 –EDU 325

EDU 510 course description [19]

 

EDU 230 [20] and EDU 325, [21] course descriptions
EDU 510 - Transformative Change and Responsive Teaching

 

The course will provide MAT candidates with a basic knowledge and understanding of the three basic tenets of differentiated instruction and the DATA Model that describes differentiated approaches for teaching and assessment. Candidates will explore each facet of the DATA model, and through creative projects and field experience, they will work to make substantive connections between the theory of Differentiated Instruction and real classroom practices and strategies. Course topics include educational philosophy, the history of education, Multiple Intelligences, Learning Styles, assessment, and reflective practice. Prerequisite: Full Admission to the MAT Program

 

 

 

 

 

EDU 230 - Common Elements of Differentiated Instruction

This is the first education course in the professional sequence that all Reinhardt students must take if they plan to enter any of the preparation programs in the Price School of Education. During the course, education students will acquire a basic knowledge and understanding of the three basic tenets of differentiated instruction, the PSOE teacher candidate proficiencies of the DATA Model, and an understanding of the nine common elements of differentiated instruction that are reflected in the DATA Model. Field experience is required. Prerequisite: PSY 101

 

EDU - 325. Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction
This course will examine differentiated curriculum, instructional strategiesand the planning of instruction to support the diverse learning needs of students and to maximize learning. Emphasis will be on the development of a nurturing environment of care and challenge that supports differentiated instruction. Prerequisite: EDU 230

 

Moreover, the syllabus for EDU 510 [22] also has the following advanced requirements not found in syllabi for EDU 230 [23] and EDU 325: [24]

  • An article analysis and critique
  • A problem-based group project about educational theories
  • A differentiated lesson plan (including the plan, implementation, assessment,
    and reflection)
  • A philosophy of education – statement and presentation
  • Additional, advanced resources and texts – provided in the syllabus

EDU 550 contrasted with EDU 325/327

Similarly, “EDU 325- Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction” combines with “EDU 327 - Differentiated Instruction and Assessment” in the graduate course “EDU 550 - Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment for Responsive Teaching.”

Table 3.6.1-7 Course Description Contrast:  EDU 550 with EDU 325 –EDU 327

EDU 550 course description [25] EDU 325 [21] and EDU 327 [26],  course descriptions
EDU 550 - Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment for Responsive Teaching

This course will examine differentiated curriculum, instructional strategies and the planning of instruction to support the diverse learning needs of students and to maximize learning. Emphasis will be on the development of a nurturing environment of care and challenge that supports differentiated instruction. The course will also examine the use of systematic formal and informal assessment as an ongoing diagnostic activity to guide, differentiate, and adjust instruction in the early childhood classroom. Emphasis will be placed on adapting essential content, teaching practices, and student products based on assessment data to support students’ diverse learning needs and to maximize learning. Prerequisite: Stage I Admission (Candidacy).

 

 

 

EDU 325 - Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction

This course will examine differentiated curriculum, instructional strategies, and the planning of instruction to support the diverse learning needs of students and to maximize learning. Emphasis will be on the development of a nurturing environment of care and challenge that supports differentiated instruction. Prerequisite: EDU 230

 

EDU 327 - Differentiated Instruction and  Assessment
This course will examine the use of systematic formal and informal assessment as an ongoing diagnostic activity to guide, differentiate, and adjust instruction in the PK-12 classroom. Emphasis will be placed on adapting essential content, teaching practices, and student products based on assessment data to support students’ diverse learning needs and to maximize learning. Prerequisites: Stage I Admission to PSOE and EDU 325.

The syllabus for EDU 550 [27] has the following advanced requirements that are not in requirements in the syllabi for EDU 325 [24] and EDU 327 [28]:

  • An article analysis and critique
  • Price School of Education (PSOE) Lesson Plan – taught and required
  • Analysis of Impact
  • Speech on differentiation – problem-based assignment -explain to parents
    about differentiation
  • Curriculum, Instruction, & Assessment Connection
  • Data Analysis (2017) – in depth look at assessment in planning and for learning
  • Additional, advanced resources and Texts – provided in the syllabus

Therefore, both graduate courses, EDU 510 and EDU 550, have additional quantity and more rigorous quality of coursework than corresponding undergraduate courses, illustrating the kind of advanced academic content in MAT courses.

The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Writing

The graduate courses in the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Creative Writing are designed to advance writing skills that might be only introduced in undergraduate courses.

For example, “ENG 386 – Poetry Writing” or “ENG 389 – Fiction Writing,” each introduces students to the basic elements of a creative writing genre—like characterization, setting and dialogue, for fiction.  Students learn to improve their writing in workshops with other students in the class, and each student creates a portfolio of original work at the end of the course.

Applicants for the Reinhardt MFA program must submit a portfolio of original work as part of the admission requirement.  This portfolio must include a sample creative manuscript (10 pages of poetry OR 20 pages of fiction/non-fiction OR 30 pages of a script); a critical writing sample (4-5 pages), and a personal essay (2-4). [29] Therefore, applicants must demonstrate that they are more advanced writers when they start the MFA program.

MFA graduate courses, like “ENG 560- Creative Writing I,” require degree candidates to work one-on-one with a professional writer to advance established creative writing skills.

Table 3.6.1-8 Course Description Contrast:  ENG 560 with ENG 386 or ENG 389

ENG 560 course description [30]

 

ENG 386 [31] and ENG 389 [32] course descriptions
ENG 560 – Creative Writing I
In this individual study, the student will work one-on-one with a mentor to develop elements of writing craft, including image, structure, syntax, diction, voice, tone, style, figurative language, point of view, characterization and plot.   The student will submit monthly portfolios of work to the mentor for comments and will revise in response to the mentor’s suggestions.   The student and the mentor will draft a timetable of due dates and logistical processes at the beginning of each semester.  Additionally, the instructor will familiarize the student with resources for calls for submissions and require the student to compose a query letter and submit at least one piece of work for publication.  In addition to monthly portfolio comments, the mentor will write an end-of-semester evaluation detailing the students’ strengths, weaknesses, and progress in the program.
ENG 386 – Poetry Writing

 

This course introduces students to the techniques of writing poetry.  Students study the basic elements of poetry, including imagery, rhyme, meter, and stanza form. Students read a variety of poems as models and assemble their own portfolio of original work.

 

Or

 

ENG 389 – Fiction Writing

 

This course includes the study of fiction writing, as well as the examination of effective critical evaluation methods.  Emphasis is placed on the elements of fiction characterization, point of view, setting, plot, narration, dialogue, and style.  Publication avenues and revision are also discussed.

 

In the graduate course, ENG 560,  the MFA degree candidate creates and submits a monthly portfolio—rather than one portfolio per course—for the writing professional/mentor to critique and for the student to revise. [33]  The graduate course also requires the student to compose a query letter and submit at least one creative piece for publication.

As these examples from the MBA, MAT, and MFA demonstrate, Reinhardt’s graduate courses are progressively more advanced in academic content than its undergraduate courses.

Mastery of the Discipline

In addition to progressively advanced course work, each of Reinhardt’s master’s degree programs has a capstone requirement to demonstrate mastery of, and independent thought about the discipline.

In the MBA program, after each two courses, a candidate for the degree must prepare an oral presentation (Practicum) with a practical application of the advanced principles just learned to demonstrate independent thought about these principles.  These presentations are evaluated by business faculty and community professionals using a standardized evaluation form. [34] At the end of the MBA program, each student must prepare a final portfolio composed of six assignments, with an additional narrative for each assignment linking it with an MBA student learning outcome [35] as illustrated by a sample MBA portfolio. [36] Each student must also give a final professional presentation about a project in the portfolio to a panel of business faculty and professionals.

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) candidates have a similar portfolio requirement along with a Comprehensive MPA Examination. [37]  MPA candidates produce a professional portfolio, due in the last course of the program, which consists of  1) the best MPA research paper, 2) a 15-page paper analyzing the candidate’s internship or professional experience including an application of course work to the practical experience, and 3) an assessment of how the MPA program components have addressed the MPA learning outcomes  [38] as illustrated by a sample MPA portfolio and evaluation. [39] The final project includes an oral presentation before a panel of faculty and community professionals.

Teacher candidates complete the MAT program with “EDU 595 – Clinical Residency with Seminars.”  MAT degree completion requirements include successful completion of the Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA), a nationally available performance-based assessment to measure candidate teachers’ readiness to teach literacy and mathematics. [40] The score necessary for Georgia Teacher Certification, as determined by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC), is 42.  In correlation with added rigor in graduate course work, the faculty in Reinhardt’s Price School of Education have determined that the expected mean score for each graduate cohort should be 58, whereas the expected mean for an undergraduate cohort is 50.

Table 3.6.1-9 MAT and Undergraduate edTPA Expectations and Scores

edTPA Scores (ECE) by Cohort

MAT  Expectation

MAT Actual

Undergraduate (ECE) Expectation

Undergraduate (ECE)  Actual

2015-16 Mean Score

58

62.81 [41]

50

52.38

2016-17 Mean Score

58

 59.16 [42]

50

 56.40

 

Therefore, graduate students in Education are held to higher expectations with regard to performance on the required edTPA.

The MFA degree is a 60 credit-hour master’s degree with several capstone projects. Near the end of the program, the candidate must compose a critical analysis (minimum 50 pp.) of a selected published author for “ENG 600 - Thesis Part I: The Critical Essay on Craft.” [43] In addition, the MFA requires a book-length, publishable-quality collection of the candidate’s creative work (minimum 40 pp.) in “ENG 650 - Thesis Part II: The Creative Thesis.” [44]  Finally, the MFA candidate must present a public reading of creative work along with a 1-hour lecture on the craft for “ENG 610 - Graduation Reading, Craft Seminar and Program Reflection.” [45] Because the MFA program began in summer semester 2016, the first capstone requirements will be due in spring and summer semesters 2018.

Assessment of advanced academic content

All graduate programs annually assess their student learning outcomes and make improvements based on the findings. The MAT program also has the external approval of the Georgia Professional Standards as a teacher preparation program for Level-5 (graduate) certification. [18]  Starting with fall semester 2016, the University implemented an external review cycle for the programs that do not have specialized accreditation, including graduate programs beginning with the MBA in summer of 2017. [46]

The annual reports assess program learning outcomes with micro-analysis of specific assignments.  These assessments can then be linked with The Purposes of Graduate Study:

2016-2017 MBA Academic Program Assessment Report [47]
2015-2016 MBA Academic Program Assessment Report [48]
2014-2015 MBA Academic Program Assessment Report [49]

2016-2017 MAT Academic Program Assessment Report [50]
2015-2016 MAT Academic Program Assessment Report [51]
2014-2015 MAT Academic Program Assessment Report [52]

2016-2017 MPA Academic Program Assessment Report [53]
2015-2016 MPA Academic Program Assessment Report [54]
2014-2015 MPA Academic Program Assessment Report [55]

A key element of advanced program rigor in “The Purposes of Graduate Study” involves advanced research:  “III - Mastery of skills to research a topic thoroughly.”

The MBA program assesses this principle through its program student learning outcome, “M6-Research Methodologies” stating that candidates will Derive business decision-making applications based upon sound research practices and procedures.”  The 2015-2016 MBA Program Assessment included a curriculum map [56] for each learning outcome: as a result, “M6-Research Methodologies” is introduced in BUS 601 (Management), reinforced in BUS 621 (Human Resources), and mastered in BUS 641 (Quantitative Decision Making).  The curriculum mapping strengthened instruction of research methodologies throughout the MBA program sequence. The 2016-2017 MBA Program Assessment [57] indicates that the target was partially met in BUS 601, but in BUS 641 the target for M6 was satisfactorily met.

The MAT program coordinator monitors research competencies through the program learning outcome, “3 - The teacher candidate uses systematic formal/informal assessment as an ongoing diagnostic activity to measure student growth and to guide, differentiate, and adjust instruction.” Although Reinhardt MAT students have a 100% pass rate on edTPA, the 2016-2017 MAT Program Assessment [58] recommends actions to strengthen even further results on edTPA rubrics 11-15 which involve understanding and analyzing assessment data.

Through the annual assessments of program learning outcomes, which align with “The Purposes of Graduate Study,” as well as external reviews for certification, Reinhardt graduate academic program coordinators and directors monitor the advanced academic content of graduate programs.

Conclusion

As demonstrated above, Reinhardt University’s master’s level programs are progressively more advanced than its undergraduate programs in course description, content, assignments, and capstone projects.  A summary of elements of advanced content appears in the attached template. [59] Reinhardt also has regular assessments to monitor the advanced academic standards in graduate courses. Therefore, Reinhardt University is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.6.1 – Post-baccalaureate Program Rigor.

 

Supporting Documents

[1] The Purposes of Graduate Study, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p 7

[2] General Education and University Learning Outcomes, Undergraduate Academic
Catalog 2016-2017, pp. 8-9
.

[3] ENG 520 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, pp. 69-70

[4] ENG 497 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 68

[5] Master of Business Administration (MBA) student learning outcomes

[6] B.S. in Business Administration, student learning outcomes, p. 70

[7] BUS 625 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 62

[8] BUS 303 course description, Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017,
p. 205

[9] BUS 503 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 62

[10] BUS 610 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 62

[11] BUS 300 course description, Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017,
p. 205

[12] BUS 610 course syllabus, fall semester 2016

[13] BUS 300 course syllabus, fall semester 2016

[14] BUS 621 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 62

[15] BUS 422 course description, Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017,
p. 207

[16] BUS 621 course syllabus, spring semester 2015

[17] BUS 422 course syllabus, spring semester 2017

[18] PSC approval for MAT Level-5 Certification, 2009

[19] EDU 510 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 63

[20] EDU 230 course description, Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017,
p. 218

[21] EDU 325 course description, Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017,
p. 218

[22] EDU 510 course syllabus, fall semester 2016

[23] EDU 230 course syllabus, spring semester 2017

[24] EDU 325 course syllabus, spring semester 2017

[25] EDU 550 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 65

[26] EDU 327 course description, Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017,
pp. 218-19

[27] EDU 550 course syllabus, spring semester 2017

[28] EDU 327 course syllabus, spring semester 2017

[29] MFA Admission Requirements, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 52

[30] ENG 560 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 71

[31] ENG 386 course description, Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017,
p. 228

[32] ENG 389 course description, Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017,
pp. 228-29

[33] ENG 560 course syllabus, spring semester 2017

[34] MBA Practicum Evaluation Form

[35] MBA Portfolio Directions, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 34

[36] Sample MBA portfolio

[37] MPA Comprehensive Examination sample questions and grading rubric

[38] MPA Professional Portfolio Requirements

[39] Sample MPA portfolio and evaluation

[40] MAT degree completion requirements, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017,
p. 39

[41] edTPA scores 2015-2016

[42] edTPA scores 2016-2017

[43] ENG 600 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017 p. 72

[44] ENG 650 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017 p. 72

[45] ENG 610 course description, Graduate Academic Catalog 2016-2017, p. 72

[46] Schedule of program reviews

[47] 2016-2017 MBA Program Assessment Report

[48] 2015-2016 MBA Program Assessment Report

[49] 2014-2015 MBA Program Assessment Report

[50] 2016-2017 MAT Program Assessment Report

[51] 2015-2016 MAT Program Assessment Report

[52] 2014-2015 MAT Program Assessment Report

[53] 2016-2017 MPA Program Assessment Report

[54] 2015-2016 MPA Program Assessment Report

[55] 2014-2015 MPA Program Assessment Report

[56] MBA Curriculum Map, 2015-2016 MBA Program Assessment Report, pp. 17-21

[57] 2016-2017 MBA Program Assessment Report, pp. 13-14

[58] 2016-2017 MAT Program Assessment Report, pp. 9-10

[59] Template for Comprehensive Standard 3.6.1, Post-Baccalaureate Program Rigor