By India Pilgrim

Dr. Linda Morgan’s teaching philosophy, which she demonstrates inside and outside the classroom, can be simplified to the golden rule, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

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Dr. Linda Morgan

The interim dean of the Cauble School of Nursing & Health Sciences and associate professor of nursing started teaching to help students get a well-rounded nursing education that included care and passion.

“I model caring to my students in my classroom and clinical setting. We live in such a technological age that sometimes we forget about the human aspects of nursing,” said Morgan.

One of her passions she shares with her students is research, her favorite nursing class to teach. In this class, Morgan allows students to choose their topic because it enables her students to develop more passion toward their studies in the course.

Morgan recently showed her strong work ethic as she took on the role of interim dean of the Cauble School of Nursing & Health Sciences and greatly contributed to the University’s direction for handling the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Dr. Morgan performed her duties faithfully, with a strategic mind-set, and with great joy,” said Dr. Mark Roberts, acting president, provost and executive vice president. “I am particularly grateful to Dr. Morgan's contributions, input and insights when Reinhardt began responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. Her expertise in crisis management, nursing and mental health was especially valuable to the team and to me.

“Moreover, she unfailingly kept, and continues to keep, the Cauble School moving forward as we develop plans to move the operations from Chattahoochee Technical College to a renovated space in the Pickens County Schools, near downtown Jasper,” Roberts continued.

Morgan goes above and beyond, not only teaching her classes about the kind of care needed to become a nurse but also exemplifies this in her own life. One story she tells her students details how she went above and beyond the call of duty when she worked as a Perinatal Case Manager for migrant families in South Georgia.

The woman had been in the United States for a week and was 37 weeks pregnant. When Morgan was finally able to find a doctor that would see her, 40 miles away, Morgan drove the pregnant mother and her young daughter to the appointment, even stopping to get the daughter ice cream while driving back. When the family experienced a medical emergency, Morgan was the only person the mother would allow to help her child.

Even though they did not speak the same language, Morgan went out of her way to care for this family and the impact was a lasting one.

“You never know what impact you will have on a person. Remember the golden rule - do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

Morgan also works as a Quality Matters Master Reviewer, where she reviews courses all over the country. She feels that each review teaches her something new, helping her grow into a better professor.

“I learn something new with every review and it helps me be a better teacher.”

When she’s not teaching, Morgan enjoys reading and card making, in which she has been making cards for 22 years.