School of Arts & Humanities Faculty

School of Arts & Humanities Faculty

Communication Faculty

Shalanda Dixon, M.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Communication

Gregory Flail, Ph.D.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Communication

Marcia-Hair

Marcia Hair, M.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Communication and Conflict Resolution

Marcia Hair has been a part of the Atlanta community for over 40 years, as an educator, artists’ agent, corporate art consultant, and mediator. Born in Florida and educated in Georgia, she spent most of her undergraduate career at the University of Georgia, where she was a member of the Georgia Debate Union, before earning her B.A. degree in Theater and M.A. degree in Communication at Georgia State University. She continued with post-graduate work in Mediation at the Manley Institute, Conflict Resolution Academy, and Institute of Continuing Legal Education. Academic interests include the structure of effective health care messages, gender and politics, public speaking, rhetorical theory, speechwriting, conflict resolution, and corporate communication. In addition to her work with architects and space planners on the arrangement of art collections for businesses and academic institutions, she currently serves as a family and divorce mediator with Cobb County Superior Court. Her specialty in mediation is in working with victims of domestic violence and families in crisis, and she currently aids pro se parties in pre-hearing negotiations in Temporary Protective Order Court proceedings.

Ms. Hair is married, the mother of grown children, and a professional grandmother. Spare time is devoted to gardening, travel, kayaking, and mountain hiking.

Atiya King

Atiya King, M.F.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Communication and Multimedia

Josh Marsh

Josh Marsh, Ph.D.

Professor of Communications

Screenwriting, Digital Storytelling, Advanced Multimedia, Web and Media Design

Julia Silka

Julia Silka, M.S.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Communication and Strategic Communication

Pam-Wilson

Pam Wilson, Ph.D.

Professor and Program Coordinator for the Communication and Media Studies Program

770.720.5578
PSW@reinhardt.edu

Cultural Studies of Media, Intercultural Communication, Media History, Film and Television Studies, Writing

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
M.A., University of Texas
B.A., Bryn Mawr College

Co-author of Global Indigenous Media: Cultures, Poetics and Politics (Duke University Press, 2008)

Dr. Pam Wilson brings a passion for exploring new cultures and a love for visual and written communication to her teaching at Reinhardt, where you will find her leading courses in intercultural communication, mass media, theories of visual culture, writing, and qualitative research.

Born in North Carolina, she has lived in many states. She received her B.A. in cultural anthropology from Bryn Mawr College, an M.A. in linguistic anthropology from the University of Texas and another in Radio, TV, & Film from the University of North Carolina, and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in Communication Arts (Media and Cultural Studies).

Wilson is a scholar and a photographer. Most of her recent scholarly work has focused on various aspects of media and cultural representation, often from a historical perspective and with a special interest in the cultural politics of regional, minority, and indigenous media representations and practices. Her edited book, Global Indigenous Media, was published in 2008 from Duke University Press, and she has numerous articles and book chapters. You can see more about her at https://reinhardt.academia.edu/PamelaWilson.

Wilson worked in non-profit administration for many years doing community organization, volunteer development, and public relations for Girl Scout councils in Ohio, Texas and North Carolina.

An adventurous spirit, Wilson has traveled broadly to China, Europe, Russia, Turkey, and Canada, and she often leads study abroad programs. She loves to learn by experience, and she is a photographer and a writer as well as a teacher and scholar. Her photography website is http://www.culture-quest-photography.com. Wilson is married and has a young adult son.

English Faculty

Kathleen Alden, M.S.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition (Online)

Molly Armstrong-Paschal, M.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition (Online)

Stephanie M. Autry, M.F.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition

Kerry Burke, M.F.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition

Alfred Carson

Alfred Carson, M.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition and Literature

William Carter, M.F.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition

Donna L. Coffey Little, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of English
Director of the Honors Program for 2011-2012

Creative Writing; Romanticism; Modernism; Women's Literature; Environmental Approaches to Literature; Holocaust Studies

DLC@Reinhardt.edu
770-720-5582

B.A., College of William and Mary
M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
M.F.A. in Creative Writing, Pine Manor College
Ph.D., University of Virginia

Faculty Awards:
Faculty Research /Scholarship Award (2007)
United Methodist Exemplary Teaching Award (2004)

Catherine Emmanuel

Catherine Emanuel, Ph.D.

Director of the Center for Student Success

cbe@reinhardt.edu
770-720-9232

Eighteenth Century British Literature, The Origins of the Novel, the Poetry of William Butler Yeats, History of the English language, Creative Nonfiction Writing, Fiction Writing, Creative Writing, Contemporary Southern Literature, African-American Literature

B.A. Winthrop University
M.A. Appalachian State University
Ph.D. University of Tennessee

Catherine Emanuel’s creative and scholarly works have appeared in West Virginia Philological Papers, A House of Gathering: Poets on May Sarton, The Puckerbrush Review, The Tennessee English Journal, Southern Voices in Every Direction, Kalliope, Crossroads, New River Free Press, The Phoenix, The Cold Mountain Review, and the next edition of Naugatuck River Review.

Catherine Emanuel successfully completed a grant from the History Channel to create the documentary film “The History of Athens: Understanding the Hidden Truth,” completed in 2007.

Joy A. Farmer, Ph.D.

Professor of English
Coordinator of the English Program

JAF@Reinhardt.edu
770-720-5633

American Literature, Southern Literature, Literature and film

Recent Achievement: What I Miss Most About Marriage (Finishing Line Press 2012)

Faculty Awards: Faculty Research/Scholarship Award (2003)

Gregory Flail, Ph.D.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition

Michelle Harlow

L. Michelle Harlow, M.F.A.

Associate Professor of English
Coordinator of English Secondary Education

LMH@Reinhardt.edu
770-720-5576

Classical literature; drama; theatre, English Secondary Education

B.A., University of Oklahoma
M.Ed., Central State University

Faculty Awards:
Vulcan Teaching Award (2006)
Jane England Teaching Award (2008)

Ms. Harlow completed a master's thesis about differentiated learning styles in college education. In her 16 years at Reinhardt University, she has performed in and directed plays for the Cherokee Little Theatre Players. She has written a screenplay from a contemporary novel, and she teaches script writing for stage and film. In addition, she is interested in international travel, most recently as part of a Fulbright-Hayes funded study trip to China and Tibet in the summer 2005. Ms. Harlow, who has served as faculty advisor for S.T.A.R. (student drama club) as well as Director of Reinhardt 100 (first-year experience), received the Vulcan Award for Teaching Excellence in 2006 and the Jane England Teaching Award (2008).

Judith Irvine

Judith Irvine, Ph.D.

Faculty Sponsor, Sigma Tau Delta, English Honor Society

Renaissance Literature; Advanced Grammar; Composition, Rhetoric, and Research

Graham Johnson, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of English

GPJ@Reinhardt.edu
770.720.5627

Old and Middle English language and literature, Old Norse language and literature, Historical Linguistics, Medievalism (particularly the work by the Inklings), Paremiology (study of proverbs)

B.A. English Honors, University of British Columbia
M.A. Medieval Studies, University of Toronto
Ph.D. Saint Louis University

A dual Canadian/American who grew up in Vancouver, BC, Dr. Johnson completed a dissertation entitled Ancestral Wisdom: Old and Middle English Proverb Collections. It is a study of the four major proverb collections from medieval England. Interest in becoming a medievalist began in a 200-level British Literature survey as a sophomore, centering upon puzzlement over the meaning of what exactly Hrothgar is telling Beowulf in "Hrothgar's Sermon." From this point, it was but a step to begin studying Old English as a language. Interest in proverbs, maxims, and other assorted "wisdom-bites" followed, especially concerning their use in Old English and Old Norse literature. Dr. Johnson joined the Reinhardt University English faculty in fall 2007. He teaches linguistics, Viking literature, Arthurian literature, Chaucer, and Tolkien.

In 2013-2014, he received the United Methodist Exemplary Teaching Award. 

Maria Klouda, M.F.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition

Callie Messerschmidt, M.A.P.W.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition

Margaret Morlier

Margaret M. Morlier, Ph.D.

Professor of English
Associate Dean for Academic Services and Graduate Studies

MMM@Reinhardt.edu
770.720.5579

Milton; Victorian Poetry; 19th c. British Fiction; the Bible as Literature

B.A., M.A., University of New Orleans 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee

Margaret M. Morlier completed a masters thesis about Milton (1980) and a dissertation about Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1986). Between 1987 and 2000, she taught at the University of Richmond and Auburn University. She has been a member of the Reinhardt University faculty since 2000, where she has taught courses in Victorian poetry, the English novel, Milton, the Bible as Literature, literary theory, and women's literature. In 2004-2005, she served as Vice-Chair of the Faculty Senate. From fall 2006-spring 2009, she served as Chair of the Faculty Senate. In 2004-2005, she was selected as a Governor's Teaching Fellow for the State of Georgia. In 2005-2006 she was Director of the Reinhardt University Institute for Teaching Excellence (ITE). From 2002-2011, she also served as Director for the Reinhardt University Honors Program. Since January 2011, she has been the Associate Vice Dean for Academic Services and Graduate Studies.

"The Maze Within: Lady Mary Wroth’s “strang labournith” in Pamphilia
to Amphilanthus." Bloom's Literary Themes (2009).

“The Hero and The Sage: Elizabeth Barrett’s Sonnets ‘To George Sand’ in
Victorian Context.” Victorian Poetry 41(Fall 2003).

“A Note on ‘Goblin Market’: A Literary Source in Caroline Bowles Southey’s
‘Young Grey Head.’” The Journal of Pre-Raphaelite Studies, n.s. 8 (Fall 1999).

“Sonnets from the Portuguese and the Politics of Rhyme.” 
Victorian Literature and Culture 27 (1999).

"'Barbarous in Beauty': The Violence of Time in the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins."
Victorian Poetry 35 (1997): 215-32. 
Reprinted in Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism 189 (2008).

“Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Felicia Hemans: the ‘Poetess Problem.’”
Studies in Browning and His Circle 20 (1992).

“And She for God in Her: Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s New Eve.”
Sexuality, the Female Gaze, and the Arts. Susquehanna University Press (1992).

“The Death of Pan: Elizabeth Barrett Browning and the Romantic Ego.”
Browning Institute Studies 18 (1990).
Reprinted in Critical Essays on Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1999).

Maria Schofer, M.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition

Sarah Shope, Ph.D.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition and Literature (Online)

William Walsh

William Walsh, M.F.A.

Director of the Creative Writing Program

Contemporary American Poetry; Southern Literature; Irish Cultural Studies

Marcia Wright, Ed.D.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Composition

Fine Arts Faculty

Ashley S Calicchia

Ashley S. Calicchia, M.F.A.

Adjunct Faculty

Two-Dimensional Design; Art Appreciation (online); Art History; Survey of Modern Art; Survey of American Art

B.A., Reinhardt University
M.F.A., Vermont College of Fine Arts

Jym Davis

Jym Davis, M.F.A.

Assistant Professor of Art

Drawing; Digital Art

JBD1@Reinhardt.edu

B.A., Carson Newman College
M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

In addition to teaching Digital Art and Design, Jym teaches Art Fundamentals and Painting. Jym has shown his video work internationally with organizations like Microcinema and has also created music videos for several indie artists. In addition to digital art and video, he enjoys traditional studio media and working across artistic disciplines. Jym is originally from Radford, Virginia.

Brett Mullinix

T. Brett Mullinix, M.F.A.

Assistant Professor of Art 
William W. Fincher Chair in in the Visual Arts
Coordinator, Fine Arts Program

TBM@Reinhardt.edu
770.720.5951

Drawing; Sculpture; Ceramics

"Everything in this world was developed or created by some kind of artist. I equip students across the board with the tools, knowledge and skills to be successful in any field of art they choose.” Prof. Mullinix

B.F.A.,M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

History Faculty

Clay Anderson, Ph.D.

Adjunct Faculty

American History Since 1865

Theresa Ast

Theresa L. Ast, Ph.D.

Professor of History
Coordinator of the Interdisciplinary Studies Program
Teaching and Scholarly Interests: Modern Europe; Modern Africa; WWII/Holocaust Studies; History of Science

TLA@Reinhardt.edu
770-720-5609

B.A., Kennesaw State University
M.A., Ph.D., Emory University

Theresa L. Ast completed a Masters thesis about the concentration camp Dachau and a dissertation about the American soldiers who liberated the Nazi concentration camp system during World War II. In 1992, she was awarded the John Snell Paper Prize given by the Southern Historical Association for the best thesis produced in a southern university.

She regularly teaches the two European history survey courses and offers the following seminars: Twentieth Century Europe, Modern Germany, The Holocaust in History, History of Science, Conflict in the Twentieth Century (235M), and War and Society (LST 301). 

Dr. Ast has received teaching awards from the University of West Georgia and Reinhardt University. She received the United Methodist Exemplary Teaching Award in 2000. She was selected to participate in the 2001 National Archives Documents Training Program, "Primarily Teaching," in Washington, D.C. and was selected to participate in the Georgia Governor's Teaching Fellow Program in 2003-2004.

She is particularly interested in bringing the "Scholarship of Teaching and Learning" to the Reinhardt campus and has participated in a number of Teaching Circles. In 2007, she received the Elizabeth Moss Bailey Mentor Award from Reinhardt students. In addition to coordinating the Interdisciplinary Studies Program, Dr. Ast is currently editing a collection of poetry written by a Polish-American immigrant.

Anne M. Good, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of History
History Program Coordinator

AMG@Reinhardt.edu
770-720-5570

Early Modern Germany; South Africa; Early Modern Travel and Exploration; History of Children and Childhood; Women's History; Building the Enlightenment

B.A., St. Louis University
M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Faculty Award:
Faculty Research Award (2008, 2013)

Anne Good's dissertation, "Primitive Man and the Enlightened Observer: Peter Kolb among the Khoikhoi," discusses the first major account of the indigenous people of South Africa, then known as "Hottentots" and now more commonly called Khoikhoi. This account, Peter Kolb's Caput Bonae Spei Hodiernum, was published in Germany in 1719. It became the major authority on everything to do with the Cape of Good Hope in the course of the eighteenth century. In a thesis that is part biography, part book history, part colonial cultural history and part historical ethnography, Dr. Good argues that Kolb's complex work provides us with a rich mine of information about the Khoikhoi themselves and the early history of cross-cultural interaction at the Cape. Dr. Good is in the process of revising her work for publication.

Dr. Good's first year at Reinhardt University was as a member of the Academic Support Office, tutoring students taking History classes. The fun and challenge of working one-on-one with students with a variety of learning disabilities, was a wonderful experience that helped convince Dr. Good that Reinhardt really is "the way college should be." Since taking a full-time position in the history program, Dr. Good continues to enjoy getting to know her students. She teaches a variety of courses, beginning with the foundational Western Civilization survey, and including several multi-cultural upper level seminars. Because of her interest in travel, Dr. Good has co-ordinated Reinhardt's "Year of" program twice, providing students with a variety of lectures, films and other activities to expand their horizons.

"The Construction of an Authoritative Text: Peter Kolb's Description of the Khoikhoi at the Cape of Good Hope in the Eighteenth Century," Journal of Early Modern History 10/1-2 (2006): 61-94.

"Dressing and Undressing in the History of Discovery," Terrae Incognitae 39 (2007): 83-100. 

"Childbirth and Infancy in the Formation of a New Society at the Cape of Good Hope in the Early Eighteenth Century: The Evidence From Peter Kolb," Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth 6:1 (Winter, 2013): 15-49.

Jonathan Good, Ph.D.

Professor of History
Ancient and Medieval history, late-medieval England, saints and saint cults, chivalry, national identity.

JDG@Reinhardt.edu
770-720-9149

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1994
M.A., University of Toronto, 1995
Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 2004

Jonathan Good teaches Reinhardt's Western Civilization survey courses, History 111 and 112, and upper-level courses on Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Reformation, Irish, and East Asian history. In 2009 he received Reinhardt's faculty research award, and in 2012 he received the Jane England Teaching Excellence Award. 

• Dr. Good serves as the faculty advisor for Reinhardt's chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the honor society for students of history.

• With Wendy Turner of Augusta University, Dr. Good founded the Georgia Medievalists' Group

• Dr. Good maintains First Floor Tarpley, the blog of the Reinhardt History Program.

Review of Chris Given-Wilson, Henry IV (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2016), Journal of British Studies, 56.1 (2017)

"Thoughts on 'Appalachia' as Represented in James Dickey’s Deliverance (1970)," James Dickey Review 32 (2016): 58-59. 

Review of Melissa Pollock, The Lion, the Lily, and the Leopard The Crown and Nobility of Scotland, France, and England and the Struggle for Power (1100-1204) (Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2015), Sehepunkte 16.11 (2016)

Review of Jean Michel Massing and Nicolette Zeeman, eds., King’s College Chapel, 1515–2015: Art, Music, and Religion in Cambridge (London: Harvey Miller, 2014), Sixteenth Century Journal 47.1 (2016)

The Cult of Saint George in Medieval England (paperback edition) (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell, 2015).

Full cv (pdf)

Timothy Furnish, Ph.D.

Adjunct Faculty

Islam; Mahdism

Ken Wheeler

Kenneth H. Wheeler, Ph.D.

Professor of History
President, Georgia Association of Historians (2014-2015)

U.S. History; Regional and Local History; Civil War; Violence Studies

khw@reinhardt.edu
770.720.5976

A.B. Earlham College
M.A., Ph.D. Ohio State University

Dr. Wheeler teaches a variety of courses in American history, including:

HIS 251, American History to 1865

HIS 252, American History since 1865

HIS 350, Colonial and Revolutionary America

HIS 354, Civil War & Reconstruction

HIS 356, America from 1900 to 1945

HIS 358, America since 1945

HIS 374, History of Georgia

HIS 380, Religion in America

HIS 377, American Feminism

IDS 309, Teaching and Learning: Education in America

IDS 317, Town and Gown: Local History and Culture

Faculty Research & Scholarship Award (2012)

United Methodist Exemplary Teacher Award (2009)

Elizabeth Moss Bailey Faculty Mentor Award (2008)

Vulcan Excellence in Teaching Award (2004)

Captain A.M. Reinhardt Award (2004)

Dr. Wheeler studies regional identity, the history of education, and social and industrial development in the Lower South, especially the Etowah Valley. Publications include:

Book: Cultivating Regionalism: Higher Education and the Making of the American Midwest (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2011)

Essays and Articles:

“How the Midwest Encountered the Coming of Mass Consumer Culture,” in Mapping Midwestern Minds: Essays on the Intellectual History of the American Midwest (forthcoming, Wisconsin History Society Press)

“Universalism and the Dissenting Tradition in the Deep South,” Journal of Unitarian-Universalist History (forthcoming)

with Jennifer Lee Cowart, “Who Was the Real Gus Coggins?: Social Struggle and Criminal Mystery in Cherokee County, 1912-1927,” Georgia Historical Quarterly 97 (Winter, 2013): 411-446

with G. Richard Wright, “New Men in the Old South: Joseph E. Brown and his Associates in Georgia’s Etowah Valley,” Georgia Historical Quarterly 93 (Winter, 2009): 363-387

“Higher Education in the Antebellum Ohio Valley: Slavery, Sectionalism, and the Erosion of Regional Identity,” Ohio Valley History 8 (Spring, 2008): 1-22

with Randolph Roth, et al., “The Historical Violence Database: A Collaborative research Project on the History of Violent Crime, Violent Death, and Collective Violence,” Historical Methods 41 (Spring, 2008): 81-98

“How Colleges Shaped a Public Culture of Usefulness,” 105-121, in Center of a Great Empire: The Ohio Country in the Early American Republic, Andrew R. L. Cayton and Stuart D. Hobbs, eds., Athens: Ohio University Press, 2005

“Philander Chase and College Building in Ohio,” 72-83, in Builders of Ohio: A Biographical History, Warren Van Tine and Michael Pierce, eds., Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2003

“Local Autonomy and Civil War Draft Resistance: Holmes County, Ohio,” Civil War History 45 (June, 1999): 147-159

“Infanticide in Nineteenth-Century Ohio,” Journal of Social History 31 (Winter, 1997): 407-418

“Waleska as Epicenter: Gold-seeking Methodists & the Development of Emory, Reinhardt & Young Harris Colleges” (featured address by Dr. Kenneth Wheeler) (2013)

Library Faculty

Joel Langford

Joel C. Langford, M.Ln.

Director of Library Services
University Archivist

JCL@reinhardt.edu 
770.720.5585

B.A. Birmingham-Southern College
M.Ln. Emory University

 

Joel Langford received his Masters in Librarianship from Emory University, and he has been on the staff of Reinhardt's Hill Freeman Library & Spruill Learning Center since 1985. As Director of Library Services, he oversees all aspects of library services and collections. He also serves as University Archivist - maintaining the library's collection of the University's documents, photographs, and memorabilia. His knowledge of Reinhardt's long, illustrious history has earned him the unofficial title of "College Historian."

Philosophy Faculty

James Butler, M.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Philosophy

Religion Faculty

The Rev. Robert P. Durham, D.M.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Religion (Online)

The Rev. Curtis G. Lindquist, Ph.D.

Professor of Religion and Philosophy

CGL@Reinhardt.edu
770.720.5544

Christian Theology and History; World Religions

A.B., DePauw University
M. Div., Yale University
Ph.D., Emory University

Aquiles Martinez

The Rev. Aquiles E. Martinez, Ph.D.

Professor of Religion
Coordinator, Religion Studies Program

770.720.5973

Ancient Israel, Early Christianity, Hermeneutics

M.A., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
M.A.T.S., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary
Ph.D., University of Denver/The Iliff School of Theology

"Mordecai and Esther: Migration Lessons from Persian Soil,"
Journal of the Latin American Theology: Christian Reflections from the Latino
South 4.1 (2009): 16-50.

Timoteo y Tito (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2008).

"The Immigration Controversy and Romans 13:1-7,
Apuntes: reflexiones teológicas desde el margen hispano 27, no. 4 (Winter, 2007):
124-144.

"On Sheep and Goats: The Treatment of Foreigners According to Jesus
(Matthew 25:31-46), Journal of Hispanic/Latino Theology (2007).

"Jesus, the Immigrant Child: A Diasporic Reading of Matthew 2:1-23,"
Apuntes 26, no. 3 (Fall, 2006): 84-114.

Introduccion Al Nuevo Testamento (Abingdon Press, 2006).

El Bautismo--Puetra de Entrada a Una Nueva Vida En Cristo--Manual de Estudio
(Bilingue) /Baptism--Doorway to a New Life in Christ: a Study Manual (Bilingual)
(Discipleship Resources, 2004).

Despues De Damasco: El Apostol Pablo Desde Una Perspectiva Latina
(Abingdon Press, 2004).

"I enjoy Reinhardt because it has given me the freedom and support to be creative in my teaching, research, and writing; to minister to the church and society in practical ways; to mentor students on a one-to-one basis and learn from them; and to provide them with the tools to be critical thinkers, faith-lead individuals, and leaders and agents of social change." Rev. Dr. Martinez

Barbara Stamey, M.A.

Adjunct Faculty

General Education Religion

World Languages and Cultures Faculty

Elaine McAllister, Ph.D.

Adjunct Faculty
French

Yazmin Morrone, M.A.

Adjunct Faculty
Spanish

Jennifer Summey, Ph.D.

Professor of Spanish
Coordinator, World Languages and Cultures Program